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Fred FORD
   
 

When Danny Williams left to take over Sheffield Wednesday in the summer of 1969, after the League Cup winning season, the unenviable task of replacing him went to Fred Ford.

Previously manager of both Bristol City and Bristol Rovers, as well as a trainer for the England under-23 and 'B' teams, Ford's first association with Swindon came in 1967, when he moved to the County Ground in a coaching capacity. After his year in charge at Rovers, he returned to the Town hotseat in July 1969.

His first year in charge was a great success. The Town finished in their highest position ever, 5th in Division Two, and they won two Anglo-Italian competitions, where they played the likes of Napoli, AS Roma and Juventus.

The following year was less successful. Swindon finished in 12th position, and, even before the end of that season, the board took steps to replace Ford. They arranged the transfer of Dave Mackay from Derby, with the intention of installing him as player-manager, with Ford moving to a position of chief scout until the end of his contract. Mackay refused, not wanting to take someone else's position, and Ford remained in charge.

Now that Mackay was at the club, Ford was left with a dilemma, as he would occupy the same position as Town captain Stan Harland. He tried unsuccessfully to appease the board and fit both into the side, moving Harland into a midfield role - a move which only resulted in more poor performances. Ford lasted until 1st November 1971, when a home defeat by Middlesbrough two days previously sealed his fate - the board removing him from his position, with Mackay inevitably replacing him.

MANAGERIAL RECORD AT SWINDON:

Competition P W D L Pens
Won
Pens
Lost
F A SR%
All matches 122 50 34 38 0 0 175 140 55%
League (inc. playoffs) 99 36 33 30 0 0 128 110 53%
FA Cup 6 4 0 2 0 0 13 10 67%
League Cup 6 3 0 3 0 0 10 9 50%
All other competitions 11 7 1 3 0 0 24 11 68%

 


full name

Frederick George Luther Ford

date of birth
10 February 1916